Technology at Home: free apps and advice for early years.

Software is effective as it gives all children access to the same quality resource. It is a great equaliser. We can use software to create a level playing field of access to quality information and resources. But the motivation to learn over the longer time will come from the guided learning with an adult. Remember that relationships are key to learning! Find software which requires conversation with an adult and not only moving through levels in games.

Read more at: https://enabling-environments.co.uk/2020/03/22/technology-at-home-free-apps-and-advice-for-early-years/

Digital Media Can Help Preschoolers Learn Real-World Science Skills

Young children spend about two hours each day using screen-based media, about half of which is spent on educational media, according to their parents. Many studies report that children can learn a range of skills from well-designed educational media. Yet we know relatively little about whether and how well children are able to apply skills they’ve learned from digital media in the real world. This question is particularly important for subjects that involve learning about the physical world, like science. There is a small amount of evidence that children can learn science from media. At the same time, digital media differ from the real world in ways that may be challenging for children to reconcile: digital science media are two-dimensional, are often cartoon-like or anthropomorphized, and frequently focus on refuting misconceptions rather than teaching science facts. Yet there may be ways to design science media to support children in connecting their learning to the real world. A recent study conducted by Education Development Center (EDC) and SRI Education found that four- to five-year-old children can apply science skills that they learned from digital media in the real world. The study was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Education’s Ready To Learn initiative, led by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS.

Read more at: http://joanganzcooneycenter.org/2020/03/05/digital-media-can-help-preschoolers-learn-real-world-science-skills/

DfE green lights six ‘Early Years apps’ to support home learning

The Department for Education (DfE) has approved six ‘Early Years apps’ to support students’ home learning.

Following a competition to find the highest calibre educational apps for children, a panel of experts approved a range of smartphone and tablet learning tools, designed to help parents and carers assist their children with reading, writing and speaking.

Handwriting app Kaligo is one of the successful products, blending years of neuro-scientific research with cutting-edge AI technology. Kaligo makes handwriting interactive, giving children a stylus and tablet to trace letters through colourful screens, storing their data as they go so parents and carers can monitor progression.

Read more at: https://edtechnology.co.uk/Article/dfe-green-lights-six-early-years-apps-support-home-learning/

What are the popular types and categories of apps

There are 3 types of apps:

1. Native apps

  • iOS on Objective-C or Swift
  • Android on Java
  • Windows Phone on Net

2. Hybrid apps for all platforms altogether with Xamarin, React Native, Ionic, Angular Mobile Sencha Touch etc.

3. Web apps as responsive versions of website to work on any mobile device.

Read more at: https://thinkmobiles.com/blog/popular-types-of-apps/

HOW TO CHOOSE APPS

Apps, and technology overall, are another tool for learning. Children get the most out of playing with apps if they are well chosen by you and if you play together.

All the apps in this guide have been checked using a quality framework, developed by the National Literacy Trust, together with our partners. We want you to be able to use this guidance to choose your own quality literacy apps. When looking at apps and thinking how they can support your child’s early literacy, we suggest that you think about the following questions:

Read more at: http://literacyapps.literacytrust.org.uk/how-to-choose-apps/

15 EdTech research papers that we share all the time

All papers on this list are linked to a record in the EdTech Hub’s growing document library – where you will find the citation and source to the full text. This library is currently an alpha version. This means it’s the first version of the service and we’re testing how it works for you. If you have any feedback or find any issues with our evidence library, please get in touch.

Read more at: https://edtechhub.org/2020/01/24/15-edtech-research-papers-that-we-share-all-the-time/

ICO publishes Code of Practice to protect children’s privacy online

“There are laws to protect children in the real world. We need our laws to protect children in the digital world too.” – UK Information Commissioner

Today the Information Commissioner’s Office has published its final Age Appropriate Design Code – a set of 15 standards that online services should meet to protect children’s privacy.

The code sets out the standards expected of those responsible for designing, developing or providing online services like apps, connected toys, social media platforms, online games, educational websites and streaming services. It covers services likely to be accessed by children and which process their data.

The code will require digital services to automatically provide children with a built-in baseline of data protection whenever they download a new app, game or visit a website.

Read more at: https://ico.org.uk/about-the-ico/news-and-events/news-and-blogs/2020/01/ico-publishes-code-of-practice-to-protect-children-s-privacy-online/

What privacy concerns do parents have about children’s mobile apps, and how can they stay SHARP? — KOALA Project Report 1

Behind the cute characters, apps used by children can not only have the possibility of exposing them to age-inappropriate content or excessive in-app promotions, but may also make a large amount
of their personal information and online behaviour accessible to third party online marketing and advertising industry. Such practices are not unique to children’s apps, but young children are probably less capable of resisting the resulting personalised advertisements and game promotions.
Currently there are no effective ways to stop these tracking behaviours on mobile devices. However, there are things that parents/families can do by making more informed choices of apps.

Read more:


Checklist & Concrete Criteria for Positive Content

The “Positive Content Criteria” are key aspects to consider when producing or providing online content and services for children: target group and age-appropriateness, attractiveness, usability, reliability, safety and privacy issues. There is also a checklist that provides a short overview of these aspects – please see below.

Read more at: http://www.positivecontent.eu/positive-content-criteria-checklist/