Category Archives: Children

Technology at Home: free apps and advice for early years.

Software is effective as it gives all children access to the same quality resource. It is a great equaliser. We can use software to create a level playing field of access to quality information and resources. But the motivation to learn over the longer time will come from the guided learning with an adult. Remember that relationships are key to learning! Find software which requires conversation with an adult and not only moving through levels in games.

Read more at: https://enabling-environments.co.uk/2020/03/22/technology-at-home-free-apps-and-advice-for-early-years/

DfE green lights six ‘Early Years apps’ to support home learning

The Department for Education (DfE) has approved six ‘Early Years apps’ to support students’ home learning.

Following a competition to find the highest calibre educational apps for children, a panel of experts approved a range of smartphone and tablet learning tools, designed to help parents and carers assist their children with reading, writing and speaking.

Handwriting app Kaligo is one of the successful products, blending years of neuro-scientific research with cutting-edge AI technology. Kaligo makes handwriting interactive, giving children a stylus and tablet to trace letters through colourful screens, storing their data as they go so parents and carers can monitor progression.

Read more at: https://edtechnology.co.uk/Article/dfe-green-lights-six-early-years-apps-support-home-learning/

What privacy concerns do parents have about children’s mobile apps, and how can they stay SHARP? — KOALA Project Report 1

Behind the cute characters, apps used by children can not only have the possibility of exposing them to age-inappropriate content or excessive in-app promotions, but may also make a large amount
of their personal information and online behaviour accessible to third party online marketing and advertising industry. Such practices are not unique to children’s apps, but young children are probably less capable of resisting the resulting personalised advertisements and game promotions.
Currently there are no effective ways to stop these tracking behaviours on mobile devices. However, there are things that parents/families can do by making more informed choices of apps.

Read more:


Can Smartphones Make Smart Kids?

“Apps as Learning Tools: A Systematic Review”1 is a timely look, from a developmental and educational perspective, at the mobile device apps that even young children are using today. This review is as important to us in observing what we do not know as what we do.

In a year when we are celebrating 50 years of Sesame Street as an iconic, genre-defining educational television program, we need to be reminded of just how revolutionary it was and continues to be (and how it has set the gold standard for educational media). Sesame Street dramatically changed early childhood education not only because it made preschool learning available to everyone who had a television but also because it used the unique access and attraction of television to teach in theoretically based, research-proven ways. The genius of Sesame Street is simple: education scholars conducted formative research to design programming that was pedagogically sound, and once the shows were made and shown, they conducted summative research to evaluate how effectively the programming met intended goals.2 The success of Sesame Street drew imitators, some of which were good, but most of which simply aimed to cash in on the fact that parents would encourage their children to watch a television program that was labeled educational, whether there was any research supporting that claim or not. Although there is still no requirement that educational claims made about children’s media be backed by research, concerned consumers supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics motivated a reality check in 2009, forcing a recall and refund of Baby Einstein videos.3,4

Read more at:

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/145/1/e20193503

Kids digital media report 2019

• We estimate that the global kids digital advertising market will continue to grow in excess of 20% p.a. (2018-21). We estimate the market will be worth c.$1.7bn by 2021

• As kids’ media and content is increasingly consumed via desktop, mobile and tablet devices, we expect brands to move more advertising spend onto these digital platforms, and shift spend away from traditional (non-digital) channels

• Additionally, increasing regulatory requirements and awareness of the benefits of compliance support a shift in spend towards dedicated ‘kidtech’ players

Read more at: https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/5009836/PwC%202019/Kids%20Digital%20Media%20Report%202019%20.pdf?

We’re asking the FTC to investigate apps that manipulate kids

Today, in conjunction with a major new study that details a host of concerning practices in apps targeted to young children, CCFC and 21 other consumer and public health advocacy groups called on the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) to investigate the preschool app market.

Read more at: https://commercialfreechildhood.org/were-asking-ftc-investigate-apps-manipulate-kids/

an overview of the core gestures used for most touch commands

The guide contains: 1) an overview of the core gestures used for most touch commands 2) how to utilize these gestures to support major user actions 3) visual representations of each gesture to use in design documentation and deliverables 4) an outline of how popular software platforms support core touch gestures  .

Read more at: https://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?1071

Children and Media Tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics

he following health and safety tips are from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety in any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source. 
 
In a world where children are “growing up digital,” it’s important to help them learn healthy concepts of digital use and citizenship. Parents play an important role in teaching these skills. Here are a few tips from the AAP to help families manage the ever-changing digital landscape.

  • Make your own family media use plan. Media should work for you and within your family values and parenting style. When used thoughtfully and appropriately, media can enhance daily life. But when used inappropriately or without thought, media can displace many important activities such as face-to-face interaction, family-time, outdoor-play, exercise, unplugged downtime and sleep. Make your plan at HealthyChildren.org/MediaUsePlan.

Read more at: https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Children-and-Media-Tips.aspx

Apps for preschoolers are flooded with manipulative ads, according to a new study

In the children’s gaming app Doctor Kids, a popular purchase in the Google and Amazon app stores, kids get to play doctor in a children’s hospital. They clean patients’ teeth as a dentist, straighten crooked bones inside an X-ray scan, and play optometrist by helping kids with blurry vision find the right prescription glasses, all against a backdrop of brightly colored characters and a twinkling soundtrack.

Until suddenly, the game is interrupted. A bubble pops up with a new mini game idea, and when a child clicks on the bubble, they are invited to purchase it for $1.99, or unlock all new games for $3.99. There’s a red X button to cancel the pop-up, but if the child clicks on it, the character on the screen shakes its head, looks sad, and even begins to cry.

Read more at: https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2018/10/30/18044678/kids-apps-gaming-manipulative-ads-ftc